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Friday, March 26, 2010

Bourke's Luck Potholes

This remarkable phenomena is situated at the confluence of the Treur (sad) and Blyde (happy) Rivers and the story behind the names are as follows:
During the early part of South African history, a group of pioneers were camped on the banks of a river and the men went off to hunt. They did not return for more than a month and the women came to the conclusion that they had either been killed or got lost and decided to pack up and leave their camp and move on.
They named the river Truer River (river of sadness as they had lost their menfolk). A couple of days later they were camped on yet another river and their men eventually caught up with them so they named it the Blyde River (river of happiness).

Bourke’s Luck Potholes was named after a gold prospector who never found any in the region but maintained that there WAS gold in the area. It turned out to be true and was once a thriving business for miners. Some say that there is still some gold to be found there.

Where the rivers meet, water erosion has formed one of the most remarkable natural geological formations of potholes.

Over thousands of years, surreal cylindrical rock sculptures created by whirling water, when the once rapid river carried masses of sand and debris, have formed a series of dark pools which contrast artfully with the streaked white and yellow lichen covered rocks.

Definition: Pothole (or kettle-hole) is also a term for a formation in rivers caused by a whirlpool eroding a hole into rock. The abrasion is mainly caused by the circular motion of small sediments such as small stones in the river. The interiors of potholes tend to be smooth and regular.

28 comments:

Tony nile life said...

Very interesting post.

Food, Fun and Life in the Charente said...

You sure know how to make me homesick! Wonderful pictures with great memories for me. Diane

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Thanks Tony. This is a wonderful place to visit when I am in the region.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

So sorry Diane. You had better come back soon and make a visit to all these places. :)

Gaelyn said...

I sure thought it was a "happy" place and would have liked to soak in a pothole. But I'll get you for the pic. ;-)

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

It sure was Gaelyn. See, you were not the only one taking pictures behind the others back. :)

On hot summers days it is wonderful to take a dip in the pools or at least put your feet in it.

Becky said...

What a wonderful story of your history. Yes, a good soaking would be great in one of those potholes! Are they very deep? Is the water really cold? Beautiful photos as usual!

JM said...

What a place! The Potholes are incredible! Great shots too.

blog with no name said...

Loan, thank you for the peek at Gaelyn!...
There is a place on top of White mesa, about twenty miles or so northeast of tuba city, that there are three of these formed in the sandstone out cropings. One of those "potholes" is about seventyfive yards long and about twenty feet deep at the center. The Navajo Fish and Wildlife stock it with rainbow trout every few years.

blog with no name said...

Sorry about spelling your name wrong, I forget to check...

Becky and Gary said...

Those are some awesome rocks, and yes I'd like to soak for a spell too. Such an interesting story. Joan.
Thanks.
B.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Thanks Becky (Florida). These mountain streams are always cold and wonderfully refreshing on a hot summers day. The holes are not very deep but with the water swirling around in them like that, they would not be a place to get into.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

I am surprised you did not go to all of these when you were here Jose. The next time you come to SA I will take you there too. It is about time you paid us a visit again.:)

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

LOL!! Gaelyn and I had sort of an agreement on photographs as I hate them been taken of me but we each took some sneaky ones like this Mike. :) Of course I am now in big trouble with her for posting this one but I know she plans to post the most awful ones of me too. LOL!!

My goodness but those potholes are large and I would think they would be the ideal place for trout too. next time you are up there, you should get some pics for us.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

No problem on the spelling Mike. I do the same thing very often as I do not have time to go back and check spelling so end up with the weirdest things. :)

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

You are welcome Becky. I am not much of a history person but some of these stories are very interesting.

Rambling Woods said...

It's funny as I am about 40 minutes from Niagara Falls and I haven't been there in years. I always like the rapids before the falls like what you are showing here..minus those beautiful rock formations... Michelle

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Niagra was one of the places I missed when I visited there Michelle. Maybe it is time for you to take a drive up there and show it to me. :)

Kenneth Ramos said...

Interesting shots there Joan. Do any paleontologist visit there?

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Thanks Ken. I am sure they have but there are no fossils on display there so I gather that there was not any interesting finds. I am sure that only the surface was covered though as there do not seem to be ang diggings either. What interested me were the larva formations, I am sure if that area was dug up a lot of very interesting finds may be hidden beneath them.

Mary said...

Wow...fascinating and I love the story of the river names. Wonderful shots of the water and the potholes.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Thanks Mary. We spent such a nice time there and I was please to be able to bring them back to show everyone.

Krista said...

WOW! Fantastic photos and really interesting commentary as well. I saw something similar in Mexico in January. It was really neat exploring.

Thanks for the tip regarding the feed!

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Thanks Krista. It is a lovelt place to visit and those rock formations are very interesting to me.

Firefly said...

Another spot I haven't been that is on my to see list. Such an amazing spot.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

You are going to have to come over so that I can take you to all these beautiful places. Gaelyn took more pictures than I did so watch out for her posts too.

Anna said...

Joan wow some of them looks like eroded bones. You know world has so much to offer to see, and I probably will not be able too. Blogging is really fun, because we can share that kind of stuff. Thanks for sharing, Anna :)

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

You are right Anna, this is a wonderful way to be able to share our wrld with others. I am seeing places and thing I would never have otherwise.