For the identification of insects and other fauna and flora of South Africa: please click on the following links:
Insects and related species: Antlions - Ants - Bees - Beetles - Bugs - Butterflies, Moths and Caterpillars - Centipedes and Millipedes - Cockroaches - Crickets - Dragonflies and Damselflies - Grasshoppers and Katydids - Mantis - Stick Insects - Ticks and Mites - Wasps - Woodlice
Plants, Trees, Flowers: (Note: Unless plants fall into a specific species such as Cacti, they have been classified by their flower colour to make them easier to find) Bonsai - Cacti, Succulents, Aloes, Euplorbia - Ferns and Cycads - Flowers - Fungi, Lichen and Moss - Grass - Trees
Animals, Birds, Reptiles etc.: Animals, Birds, Fish and Crabs - Frogs - Lizards - Scorpions - Snails and Slugs - Snakes - Spiders - Tortoise, Turtles and Terrapins - Whipscorpions
Other photography: Aeroplanes - Cars and Bikes - Travel - Sunrise - Water drops/falls - Sudwala and Sterkfontein Caves etc.

Videos: YouTube

Saturday, October 10, 2009

Kruger National Park - The other side - Part 4

I wonder if this white rhino thought I could not see him?
This was an odd fungus I found growing at the bottom of a tree.
Wet weather also brings out the termites so you have to watch where you walk as you can twist and ankle in one of these.
The rainy weather always brings out a lot of snails some as big as my hand.
A tiny little tortoise was trying to get across the road and althought his little legs were pumping hard, he could not outdistance my arms reach fast enough. I put him safely on the other side so that another car more interested in big came did not come and ride him over. :)
There are tree frog eggs over every puddle of water. With the storm we had that night, this had disintergrated when I went past the next morning. When the frogs are mating, a liquid is secreted by the female and turned into foam by rubbing their legs together. As the frogs get older (about 5 days) and heavier they fall through the foam into the water.
During the summer, jumping spiders make these huge nests in the shrubs and trees. Each ball is about as big as two men's fists put together and each contain thousands upon thousands of tiny spiders. The baboons love eating these.

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