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Sunday, June 9, 2013

Buffalo (Syncerus caffer)

Unlike other mammals, both  male and  female can only move their  lower jaw and not the upper.
 As the adult  males leave the herd for part of the time, normally returning only for the rutting season, a female is usually the herd leader.
 Weighing about eight hundred kilograms when fully matured, it is still possible for them to attain a  speed of up to forty five kilometres per  hour when charging although this would vary according to circumstances.
 Mostly they are found near water in which they wallow to keep themselves cool in the heat of  the day and also to encase themselves with mud to get rid of the ticks.

5 comments:

Gaelyn said...

Only teeth on the bottom, didn't know that. Or maybe just don't remember you telling me. ;)

@maggiezlenz said...

Never too old to learn! I was under the impression that our local Buffalo had upper molars like cattle

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Oh gosh!! Sorry Gaelyn and Maggie. I meant to say they can only move their lower jaw and not the upper. WOW!! What a mistake!! WIll correct it now. Thanks for pointing it out.

Firefly said...

The Buffalo in Addo went nocturnal due to the hunters of the late 1800's and early 1900's and even though they weren't hunted for over 70 years stayed that way until SANParks introduced lions about 8years or so ago. Suddenly the buffalo were active when the lions were hunting and immediately changed their behaviour back to normal. Now you can get awesome buffalo sightings which weren't always possible 10 years and more ago.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Thats very interesting Jonker. Thanks for the info. Nature does take care of itself doesn't it?