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Saturday, January 23, 2010

Bat-eared Fox

One unusual characteristic of the Bat-eared Fox is their teeth, it possesses extra molars and a bat-eared fox could have up to fifty teeth. Their diet consists of insects, and termites comprise 50% of the diet consumption.
A Bat-eared Fox breeds just once in a year, and the cubs are born at the start of the rainy period. The Bat-eared Fox would take care of their newborns in just one place for a long time, and the gestation can last around ten weeks. There exists a high infant mortality rate, and you know why? Sadly, there are just four nipples of the female Bat-eared Fox, thus, she might be forced to kill some of the young so that at least 4 would hold better odds of surviving. When six months have passed, the kits would have grown, and she could leave the protection and nurturing.
They are monogamous, and they are capable of living in threes, that is, one male and two from the distaff side. If found in pairs, it could be observed that they play with each other, and generally aid each other. These kind of foxes are being hunted both for the meat and for their pelts. Without meaning to, mankind has actually helped them, the clearing of grasslands have permitted the increase of termites, and these foxes naturally are happy with that.

40 comments:

Dale Forbes said...

fat eared box ;-)

Andrea said...

Funny Animal:I love it.
I took many pictures from them last year.
From your Blog there's always something lo learn:I really didn't know about the theeth.

A New England Life said...

Termites, huh? Well that's an interesting diet!

How sad that a mother might have to kill one of her own babies. Sometimes nature can be so cruel. Beautiful little fox.

Steve Borichevsky said...

Sharon, they say that termites tastes like almonds, maybe worth a try?

This is a wonderful creature, Joan. A happen to be partial to foxes.

SABlogger said...

Hi Joan looks like a mix between a bat and a rabbit.

Anna said...

Joan this is excellent post, thanks for sharing all the good info. Its amazing how nature was created certain species. Would you consider them being mistake, that they can only provide food for 4 but have more cubs? There is so much to discover and know, I guess 'survival' is the magic word. Thanks for sharing nice images too. Anna :)

Natural Moments said...

I have never seen a pix of one of these foxes before. It kind of looks like it has some raccoon in its blood. :)

Diane AZ said...

What an interesting fox! With those big ears, it looks like a creature that would be found in my desert region. We have kit foxes that are lighter in color and don't have a mask.

JM said...

So cute!

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

LOL!! A good one Dale. :)

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

I am glad you are finding it interesting Andrea. :)

Becky and Gary said...

What a cute little bugger. It looks like it's fur is so soft, and I do like those ears.
I'm so glad you have found time Blog again.
B.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

I have to say that termites are not my idea of a meal either Sharon. :)

Nature is cruel but there are a lot of animals which do the same thing. See my comment to Anna in which I will explain more.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Almonds? How do you know that Steve? Tried them yourself? They are such cte creatures. I love to watch them hunting.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

An interesting cross Lawrence. LOL!

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Thanks Anna. Nature has equipped animals with many way of survival. For examples leopards can stop the development of their babies before they are born if there is not enough food available. They will also kill babies born in these times. This is a survival instinct as it allows them to look after themselves better and so can survive to breed again.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

You are right Benrie, thats what they reminded me of the first time I saw them too.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

These are found in our desert areas too Diane. It is amazing to watch them hunting for insects as they walk with those big ears close to the ground.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Thanks Jim. Did you see any of them when you were in SA?

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

They are such lovely animals Becky and are mostly overlooked as people seem to be more interested in lions etc. I am trying to fit in a s many posts as I can. :)

Becky said...

Such soft looking fur. Love the ears, all the better to hear you with my dear! Beautiful animal!

Rambling Woods said...

What a neat looking creature and nothing like the red fox we have here that are carnivores....

Tammie Lee said...

oh my goodness
such a awesome looking critter!

Gaelyn said...

That's a lot of teeth for such a small looking fox. Sure is cute.

Sreddy Yen said...

Hi Joan! Are these fox found in SA? They're so cute! Are they perhaps the fox featured in some animated movies? Wow, it's interesting that something so negative like clearing of grasslands could help these animals.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Thanks Becky. They are very soft, almost like a toy. :)

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Those Red foxes are very beautiful Michelle. They are a bit bigger than this one though.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Thans Tammie. Those ears are what catch my attention. :)

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Thanks Gaelyn. A mouthfull for sure. :)

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Hi Sreddy. How's it going being back at school? Yes, they are found here. These foxes are found in the desert areas of Khalari Gemsbok Park on the border of Namibia.

This Is My Blog - fishing guy said...

Joan: That certainly is a fox that likes to hear what is going on.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

It is more a case of hearing where its food is Tom. :)

Craig Glenn said...

UGH I am so far behind!!!

That is one cute fox!!!

I love him.

Craig Glenn

Mary said...

The ears really give it a funny look! YOu wouldn't think it would need so many teeth to eat bugs.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Dear Mr Glenn,
You are is SUCH big trouble!! I am not sure if I like strangers to post comments on my blog.
Regards,
Joan

LOL!! LOL!! Where have you been?? I have MISSED you SO much!! I am very pleased to hear from you my friend. :) Welcome back. If you disappear like this agian, I will not speak to you for a month then I will not only forget your name but your surname too. :) LOL!!

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

All the better to chew his food Mary, some of those bugs are hard. :)

Firefly said...

I can't think that I have ever seen them in the wild. But they are very interesting animals with the funniest look.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Thanks Jonker. Go up to Kalagadi sometime. They are very active at dawn or late afternoons. They are so cute I always want to take one home with me but then I think of the great big termite mound I would have to put in my garden and change my mind. :)

Leeloo said...

What an interesting animal. Thanks for all the info, great pictures :)

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

You are welcome Leeloo. :)